Kitten Vaccination Schedule

 

A protected response is what the veterinarian is aiming for when vaccinating your kitten,

priming the immune system to produce antibodies and neutralize infectious organisms

before they have a chance to induce disease. Ideally, this is achieved through a standard schedule involving vaccines at 8, 12, and 16 weeks of age.

Variations to a schedule become necessary when, for instance, a kitten is vaccinated

at 8 weeks of age, then does not visit the veterinarian again until 16 weeks of age. 

A minimum of two injections approximately 3-4 weeks apart with the last injection

occurring at greater than 12 weeks of age is necessary. 

 

7 - 9 WEEKS OF AGE

  • Full physical examination & consultation
  • Vaccination -  FVRCP (1st)  Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis, Calici, Panleukopenia (distemper)
  • Fecal analysis for parasites
  • "Revolution" is a topical deworming and flea control product that should be applied once every 2 weeks until 12 weeks of age

 

12 WEEKS OF AGE

  • Full physical examination & consultation
  • a blood test for Feline Leukemia and Feline Immunodeficiency Virus
  • Vaccination - FVRCP (2nd)
  • Vaccination - Feline Leukemia vaccine (1st), Feline Immunodeficiency Virus vaccine (1st) if will be going outdoors
  • Strategic deworming using Revolution once every month until 6 months of age

 

16 WEEKS OF AGE

  • Full physical examination & consultation
  • A blood test for Feline Leukemia and Feline Immunodeficiency Virus if not done already
  • Vaccination - FVRCP - 3rd
  • Vaccination - Feline Leukemia  and Feline Immunodeficiency virus- 2nd
  • Vaccination - Rabies
  • Repeat fecal analysis for parasites
  • Strategic deworming and flea control using Revolution once every month until 6 months of age

 

 

6 MONTHS OF AGE

  • Ovariohysterectomy (spay) - female cats
  • Castration (neuter) - male cats
  • Strategic deworming; flea control 
  •  

YEARLY

  • Full physical examination & consultation
  • Vaccination - FVRCP
  • Vaccination - Feline Leukemia and FIV vaccines if going outdoors
  • Vaccination - Rabies
  • Fecal analysis for parasites
  • Strategic deworming/flea control 
  •   

MICROCHIP

Microchip pet identification may be done at any time, although many people choose to have this done at the time of the spay or neuter since it saves the pet a bit of discomfort.

 

STRATEGIC DEWORMING

Why deworm regularly?  Some of the most prevalent intestinal worms such as roundworm and hookworm may affect humans ("zoonoses"), especially children and people with suppressed immune systems.  Which treatment is most appropriate for your pet? Please consult with our veterinarians.